The Hooker Historical Society

 

Dedicated to the preservation of our history.

Tributes needed for Hooker History Book

Hooker History Book presales offered at Linda's Flowers and Gifts and at The Hooker Advance

(580) 652-2333 or (580) 652-2476

Volunteers needed to help research history documents.

For details email hooker1904@gmail.com

Membership in the Hooker Historical Society helps provide funding for improvements to the Society office, developing and maintaining a searcheable Hooker cemetery record, and compiling and publishing a Hooker History Book Vol. IV. The funds also allow us to maintain all documents, photos and memorabilia entrusted to the Society. We welcome your support. To become a member just print and fill out the membership form and mail it along with your membership fee to The Hooker Historical Society, PO Box 989, Hooker OK 73945

Where Did Hooker Get It's Name?

It's unusual, and seeing or hearing it usually brings a smile, a giggle, or a sly comment. Despite what you might think, the story behind the name Hooker is about a real person. The following story was taken from the book, Lost Trails of the Cimarron, by Harry Chrisman:

John (Hooker) Threlkeld was so nicknamed after Gen. "Fighting Joe" Hooker of Civil War fame, some say. Others say he received his name after an old cattleman of the Beaver River whose name was Hooker. Still others say he received his name by being such a "hooker" of cattle, that is, top roper. Wherever he received that nickname we know how the town of Hooker, OK received its name. For it was named after John "Hooker" Threlkeld.

 

Hooker was born in Kentucky, Nov. 13, 1846. He came west with his parents to Missouri. On May 15 1864, he joined up with a freight outfit and bull whacked west from Omaha to Virginia City, Montana with his two brothers. In 1873 Hooker came to No Man's Land where he spent the next 30 years in the saddle. He was foreman for the OX Ranch for many years.